Trailer Loading: Make it Safe and Heavy

By Maggie Caldwell | May 1, 2015

There's a bit of an art to effectively loading recyclable commodities into your semis. Because the cost per trip is fixed, you want to maximize the weight in order to lower the transportation cost per ton. With a lower transportation cost per ton, you can negotiate a better price on those commodities from your hauler. A better price = more value, and more value = improving your bottom line.

So when loading bales, do everything you can to minimize air space. You absolutely want to avoid paying to haul air. We've found this is the best method of loading to stay under your weight limit while maximizing available space:

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Compact Your Commercial Waste and Save Money

By Maggie Caldwell | April 3, 2015

If your business generates at least the equivalent of three 8-yard dumpsters being picked up once a week, there's a good chance investing in a compactor would be a more cost-efficient way of handling your waste. Compactors have the advantage of generating heavier waste loads, reducing the frequency of pickups and saving money on your trash bills. 

Costs involved to your business for a compactor:

  • monthly rental fees: a 3-year lease on a new 42-yard compactor can run about $400/month
  • haul charge is defined by how far the truck has to go; typically you are looking at a minimum of about $170 per load
  • disposal charge: this varies by area and runs between $45 - $75 per load

For example, if you choose a 42-yard compactor with a compaction rate of 4:1, it will hold the equivalent of 168 yards of waste, or 21 8-yard dumpsters. Adding up the average costs listed above, a once-a-month pickup will cost about $650.00. Take a look at your commercial trash bill. If you're paying more than that for service, you should look more closely at switching from a dumpster to a compactor. Be sure to read our tips on managing your compactor hauling fees to save even more money.

 

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5 Ways to Revise Your Commercial Recycling and Waste Program and Save

By Maggie Caldwell | March 20, 2015

It's easy to throw money away with an ineffective or outdated waste and recycling program. The problem is: you don't know if your program is working without checking on it occasionally. This means making time to take a look in the dumpster and trash cans, carefully reading your trash bills, and looking at the locations where trash is generated. These periodic audits keep you from, for example, paying to haul air when half-full dumpsters and contractors are picked up or from spending money to landfill items that can be recycled. 

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Recycling Your "Cats and Dogs"

By Maggie Caldwell | March 13, 2015

"Cats and dogs" are what we call the odds and ends of recyclable waste we find that most manufacturers generate. Here's what happens: you've got the big stuff in your waste program covered, for example, baling your OCC, densifying your EPS foam, and compacting your LDPE. You've got a commercial single-stream collection system in place. Maybe you've even gotten rid of the trash cans. There are always a few stragglers, often up to 20% of your waste stream, that can still be addressed.  

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Storing Your Recyclables: Gaylords vs Plastic Bins

By Maggie Caldwell | March 6, 2015

You need a simple, reliable solution for recyclable storage, whether your materials are graded or single-stream, compacted or baled. Gaylord boxes and plastic bins are the most common solutions for recyclable storage; so how do you know which one is right for you?  Each has advantages and disadvantages; ultimately it comes down to available space. 

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Case Study: Additional $144K Annual Revenue Comes From Optimizing Recycling Program

By Maggie Caldwell | November 14, 2014

Optimized recycling is about keeping labor costs low, setting up intuitive programs, and maximizing the amount of valuable grades you generate. Almost every single recycling program we see can be optimized in one of these ways, resulting in a combination of greater revenue for recyclable materials and/or lower waste and/or labor costs.

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Benefits of Commercial Single Stream Recycling

By Maggie Caldwell | October 24, 2014

Did you know your company can save money on waste hauling charges? DIVERSION is the key. Companies large and small in any business sector - whether manufacturing or distribution, wholesale or retail, eduction or tourism and more - CAN PROFIT by moving every ounce of weight away from the trash cans and into single-stream recycling bins. You may find you don't even need trash cans anymore

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5 Don't-Miss Recycling Opportunities for Food Manufacturers

By Maggie Caldwell | October 17, 2014

 

Diversion is one of the keys to a successful recycling program; every bit of weight you subtract from your trash saves you money on your solid waste hauling bill. And since food manufacturers generate large quantities of valuable recyclables, a well optimized program can create a significant revenue stream. You probably already recycle your cardboard and plastic film and shrink wrap, but there's always more you can do to save money. Here are 5 don't-miss recycling opportunities we've found are often overlooked at food manufacturing plants:

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10 Office Supplies Made From Recycled Content, So Recycle Better

By Maggie Caldwell | October 3, 2014

A committment to recycling involves more than just tossing paper and cans in a bin for others to collect. It means you're committed to closing the recycling "loop" and buying products made from as much recycled content as possible - an action that creates demand for recyclables and reduces demand for raw materials. 

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Compactors for recycling: pros and cons

By Maggie Caldwell | August 28, 2014

The biggest advantage of using a compactor for your recyclables is that it saves space. One 42-yard compactor holds about 4 tons of OCC; that is equivalent to about 80 gaylord boxes. With a compactor, valuable floor space is freed up for other uses. They are easy, clean, and simple to use. The only drawback? Compactors are comparatively more expensive than dumpsters.

Costs involved to your business for a compactor:

  • monthly rental fees: a 3-year deal on a new 42-yard compactor can run about $400/month
  • haul charge is defined by how far the truck has to go; typically you are looking at a minimum of about $170 per load
  • disposal charge: this varies by area and runs between $45 - $75 per load

When you are using a compactor for recycling, the haul charge is offset by the revenue you earn from your recycable commodities. For example, a fully packed compactor of OCC weighs about 4 tons, and you should be able to negotioate earning between $10 and $15 per ton. You can also compace LDPE and other commodities.

You can manage your compactor hauling fees to save even more money.

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